Adelaide Metro (Guide)

Adelaide Metro is the public transport system in the capital city of South Australia. The subway represents an intermodal system that is providing an integrated system of bus, tram, and train service throughout the metropolitan area. The system has annual patronage of about 76 million. The system has evolved significantly over the past fifteen years that led to the increase of patronage by 5.5 percent.

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More about Adelaide Metro (Guide)

Adelaide Metro (Guide)

Adelaide Metro is the public transport system in the capital city of South Australia. The subway represents an intermodal system that is providing an integrated system of bus, tram, and train service throughout the metropolitan area. The system has annual patronage of about 76 million. The system has evolved significantly over the past fifteen years that led to the increase of patronage by 5.5 percent.

Adelaide Metro began in 2000 with the privatization of existing government-operated train and bus routes. The Glenelg tram is the only of Adelaide-s tramways that survived the 1950s. Currently, services run by two private operators, which are united with standard ticketing systems, marketing, and signage with everything under the supervision of South Australia's Department of Planning, Transport, and Infrastructure. Energy sustainability and eco-friendliness represent two core values and significant focuses for Adelaide Metro. In recent years the fleet has been significantly upgraded with electric trains and solar-powered buses, one of which is 100% solar powered and the first of its kind in the world.

History

In 1856 the first steam train ran between Port Adelaide and Adelaide by stopping at Alberton, Woodville, and Bowden.

The Adelaide Metro was introduced as a brand in 2000 following the second round of tenders privatization of formerly government-operated bus services.

Previously the public transport system has been known under few names. The State Transport Authority that was formed in 1974 combined the tram and bus operations of the former Municipal Tramways Trust and the metropolitan rail operations of the old South Australian Railways Commission. Adelaide removed all tramlines during the 1960s and left only the Glenelg lines. In 2007 the Department of Transport, Energy, and Infrastructure extended the Glenelg tramline.

Commuter Rail

The Adelaide suburban railway network includes six lines, with all of them operated by the Department of Planning, Transport, and Infrastructure Public Transport Division.

Until 2014, the suburban network was the only one in Australia that was operating solely with diesel railcars. In 2013-2014 the full lengths of Tonsley and Seaford lines were electrified as well as the segment of the Belair line from Goodwood to its terminus at Adelaide.